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Fresh batch of hacked climate change emails hits internet

The latest release of hacked emails is apparently timed to undermine the UN Climate Change Conference to be held in Durban, South Africa next week.

Exactly two years after hundreds of climate change emails were hacked from University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit and released online, a fresh batch of hacked emails has hit the internet.

Climate change scientists Michael Mann, Phil Jones, Kevin Trenberth, Ben Santer, Keith Briffa, Tom Wigley and Kevin Trenberth are again at the center of controversy for manipulating climate change data to discredit global warming skeptics.

In the emails exchanged among them, the researchers have been “caught red-handed” confessing to one another that global warming evidence is not as strong as they would like it to be, writes Telegraph's James Delingpole.

The university is not yet sure if the latest 5,000 emails, posted on Russian server Sinwt.ru as a downloadable zip file, belong to its research unit, but a small sample examined by them appears “genuine.”

Fresh round of emails
The excerpts from the emails, which are available at popular climate skeptics blogs: Tall Bloke, Climate Audit, Air Vent, and Watts Up With That?, read:

“<1939> Thorne/MetO: Observations do not show rising temperatures throughout the tropical troposphere unless you accept one single study and approach and discount a wealth of others. This is just downright dangerous.”

“<2884> Wigley: Mike, The Figure you sent is very deceptive [...] there have been a number of dishonest presentations of model results by individual authors and by IPCC […]”

“<2009> Briffa: I find myself in the strange position of being very skeptical of the quality of all present reconstructions, yet sounding like a pro greenhouse zealot here!

“<3062> Jones: We don’t really want the bull***t and optimistic stuff that Michael has written [...] We’ll have to cut out some of his stuff.”

Is leak aimed at disrupting UN conference?
The university is not yet sure if the latest 5,000 emails, posted on Russian server Sinwt.ru as a downloadable zip file, belong to its research unit, but a small sample examined by them appears “genuine.”

Like the emails released in November 2009 that many believed were meant to disrupt the climate change summit in Copenhagen the following month, the latest release of hacked emails is apparently timed to undermine the UN Climate Change Conference to be held in Durban, South Africa next week.

“These emails have the appearance of having been held back after the theft of data and emails in 2009 to be released at a time designed to cause maximum disruption to the imminent international climate talks,” the university said.