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Android tops in mobile malware -- report

In March this year, Google took down over 20 apps from the Android marketplace after it was learned that they were carrying a Trojan called DroidDream.

You must be aware that Android is a leader when it comes to smartphones, but did you know that it also tops in mobile malware?

According to a report by Juniper Networks, Android is the leader when it comes to malware in smartphones.

The report reveals that Android malware has risen 400 percent since July this year, with October and November registering the fastest rise in malware since Google introduced the Android platform.

In October, the number of malware samples found in Android more than doubled compared to September.

Juniper's Malicious Mobile Threats Report which was released in May revealed a 400 percent rise in Android malware from 2009 to summer 2010.

Google blamed for malware rise
What is the reason behind this ominous increase in malware on Google’s mobile platform? According to Juniper, it is Google’s fault.

It is quite easy for developers to make and put applications on the Android Market, as they only need to open a developer account and pay $25.

Several security firms, including McAfee and Symantec, have expressed their concerns about the incidence of growing malware across the Android platform.

Google apparently has no review process through which it screens these apps for malware or checks them.

Though malware infected apps which are reported by users are promptly removed from the app store, it is only after many users have already downloaded the apps.

Unsuspecting users have no way of knowing which of them are malware disguised as a useful apps.

In March this year, Google took down over 20 apps from the Android marketplace after it was learned that they were carrying a Trojan called DroidDream.

Several security firms, including McAfee and Symantec, have expressed their concerns about the incidence of growing malware across the Android platform.

Android malware getting smarter
Juniper notes that Android malware are not only increasing in number, but are also getting more advanced. Most Android malware now have the ability to access personal data or important services.

Android malware can be of different types, depending on what they can do. Over half of the malware samples were found to be spyware, fishing out personal user information.

The other half consisted mostly of SMS Trojans which sends text messages to premium-rate numbers, thus costing the users.