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Aliens may kill earthlings for global warming -- scientists

The extraterrestrial beings might take drastic action against earthlings if they find evidence that humans are destroying the environment.

With human efforts failing to make a serious dent in the problem of global warming, it seems aliens might soon take up the challenge.

A new study entitled 'Would contact with extraterrestrials benefit or harm humanity? A scenario analysis' warns that the rising levels of carbon emissions could trigger a hostile alien attack.

Scientists Seth D. Baum, Jacob D. Haqq-Misra from Pennsylvania State University together with Shawn Goldman, a postdoc at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C. have compiled a list of hypothetical situations should human beings actually encounter extraterrestrials.

The report explores situations that could be beneficial, neutral or harmful to the human civilization.

Dire situations
According to the latest study, the aliens might want to destroy mankind if they perceive our civilization was growing out of control and the rapid growth was posing a grave threat to other life forms.

The extraterrestrial beings might take drastic action against earthlings if they find evidence that humans are destroying the environment.

The authors write, "These scenarios give us reason to limit our growth and reduce our impact on global ecosystems. It would be particularly important for us to limit our emissions of greenhouse gases, since atmospheric composition can be observed from other planets.”

Extraterrestrials might intentionally eat or enslave people on earth. Other dire outcomes could be classified as aliens using technology for destruction of our planet or diseases wiping out the entire population.

According to the latest study, the aliens might want to destroy mankind if they perceive our civilization was growing out of control and the rapid growth was posing a grave threat to other life forms.

Benefits of an alien encounter
The best case scenarios put forward by the scientists of an alien encounter could be healthy discussions on math and science. It could lead to exchange of information to help solve serious issues like world hunger or poverty and disease.

Another beneficial scenario could be man triumphing over alien force and learning from their technology.

The researchers added, "Humanity benefits not only from the major moral victory of having defeated a daunting rival but also from the opportunity to reverse-engineer ETI [extraterrestrial intelligence] technology.”

The study has been published in the journal 'Acta Astronautica.'